The Dairy Industry's Derived Demand for Feed Grains and Its Effect on the Cottonseed Market

Priscilla B. Arguello, Jaime Malaga, Benaissa Chidmi, Jose A. Lopez

Abstract


Nitrate is the most common groundwater contaminant. The objective of this experiment was to determine if Triticum aestivum (wheatgrass) is able to act as a phytoremediator of nitrates present in wastewater and how nitrogen (N) accumulation in wheatgrass is affected by the nitrate concentration in a hydroponic system. Wheatgrass was reared in six hydroponic units containing 0, 100, or 200 ppm added nitrate (n = 15 tanks for 100 and 200 ppm added nitrate and five for 0 ppm added nitrate control). Plants were grown for 12 days prior to harvest. The harvested shoots and roots were dried, ground, and analyzed for total nitrogen. Plants grown in 200 ppm nitrate solution contained a greater (9.9%; P < 0.05) concentration of nitrogen in the shoots than control plants with the 100 ppm nitrate solution being intermediate. Plants grown in 200 ppm nitrate solution contained a lower (16%; P < 0.05) concentration of nitrogen in the roots than control plants with the 100 ppm nitrate solution being intermediate. Nitrate and nitrate-N concentrations in the water were reduced to levels considered to be non-problematic for consumption by mature cattle for the 100 ppm treatment, but not the 200 ppm treatment.


Keywords


wheatgrass; nitrate; nitrogen

Full Text:

PDF

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.