Effects of Protein or Energy Supplementation on In Situ Disappearance of Low- and High-Quality Coastal Bermudagrass Hay in Goats

Michelle S. Reinhard, Andrew P. Foote, Barry D. Lambert, Jim P. Muir

Abstract


The objective of this research was to determine if supplementing protein or energy would improve the ruminal in situ disappearance of two qualities of (5.8 or 13.4% CP) Coastal Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) hay in goats. Treatments were arranged in a 4 × 4 Latin Square design and consisted of either sodium caseinate (0.122% BW), corn starch (0.15% BW), or dextrose (0.15% BW) administered daily into the rumen; compared to a hay-only control.  Goats had ad libitum access to Coastal Bermudagrass hay (5.8 and 13.4% CP for experiment 1 and 2, respectively) at all times during the experiment.  Each period consisted of 14 days for treatment adaptation and followed by incubation of in situ bags.  In situ hay samples were analyzed for dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber disappearance after ruminal incubation.  Dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber disappearance were not affected (P > 0.05) by protein or energy supplementation in when either high- or low-quality bermudagrass was fed. Further research is needed to determine if this was due to the nutritive value of the basal diet, or the value of the diet selectively ingested by the goats from the basal diet.


Keywords


small ruminant; digestion; supplements; nutritive value; forage quality

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